Engine Change

Written by Ivan on 16/09/2011. Posted in Repairs and ongoing maintenance

In response to customer complaints that the needle on the temperature gauge kept fluctuating when the thermostat opened and closed Dodge, in their infinite wisdom, moved the coolant sensor from the back to the front of the engine.  The rear (number 6) cylinder runs the hottest which can cause problems because the driver cannot detect an overheat condition on the gauge until it is too late.  Pulling my 5th wheel back from a trip to the US in hot conditions it happened to me.  Number 6 overheated, melted the piston and scored the bore.  The only evidence of this was a “knock” and a slight loss of power.  It speaks volumes for the Cummins engine that I was able to drive the rig home some 2 hours further.

Cylinder_head

The Turbo, Valve Cover, APPS, Injectors and Lines, Valve Rockers and Pushrods were removed and then this baby; 130 pounds of Cylinder Head and Exhaust Manifold.  This exposed the Cylinder Bores and Pistons.

Cylinders

Number 6 and Number 5 showed signs of overheating and subsequent scoring of the bores.  Numbers 1 and 2 had hair line cracks in the piston rims.

Damaged_Piston

Number 6 Piston and Bore.

No_6_Piston

Number 6 removed by dropping the Oil Pan, disconnecting the Big End and pushing up.

The damage to the bores could not be honed out so it meant removing the engine and sending the block away to be bored over size with new, larger pistons fitted.  A friend had a virtually new identical engine (15,000 miles) sitting on a pallet just down the road.  He had bought it from a wrecked truck because he needed the cylinder head.  We did a deal and engine removal commenced.

Engine_Removal

Engine_Removal_2

Engine_Removal_3

Engine_Removal_4

The blue item is a Triple Disc Torque Converter connected to the automatic transmission.

Replacement_Engine_1

This is the replacement engine prior to mounting on a rotating engine stand.  I will be removing all the ancilliary items, wiring and the Cam Shaft from it prior to de-greasing and painting.  The Cam is being sent off for re-profiling to produce more low RPM torque, better fuel consumption, reduced EGT’s and quicker Turbo spool up.

Bottom_End

Pistons, Rods, Big Ends and Crank checked and cleaned and ready for the Oil Pan.

Bottom_End_Complete

Cam_Shaft_Fitted

Oil Pump checked and serviced.  New Cam Shaft fitted.

Head_On

Cylinder Head and Injection Pump fitted.

Nearly_Ready_1

Almost ready to fit.

Nearly_Ready_2

Waiting for the Exhaust Manifold Gaskets.

Nearly_Ready_3

Front End buttoned up.

Here’s a few final shots of the engine before installation.

Engine_Final_1

Engine_Final_2

Engine_Final_3

Engine_Final_4

Engine_Final_5

Beginning the installation.

Going_Home_1

Going_Home_2

Going_Home_3

Going_Home_4

Going_Home_5

The engine installed and connected up.

New_Engine_1

New_Engine_2

And finally the re-located Transmission Oil Cooler.  This used to be bolted on the side of the block adjacent to number 6 cylinder beneath the exhaust manifold.  I think it will work a lot better here.  The zip tie will go tomorrow when it is welded into place!

Trans_Oil_Cooler_edited-2

And the truck runs??

 

SurprisedLaughingLaughingLaughing Fantastic!!

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